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Jupiter - First light DIY spectrometer

spectroscopy

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#1 Astrobodger

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 10:26 AM

Hi Everyone,

 

It's been a while since I was last on here.

 

I have built a new modular DIY classical spectrometer (from plastic guttering parts ;) ) which allows the potential to swap components about. Anyway here was first light on Jupiter taken 14th Nov. Most of the spectral lines are reflected sunlight, but there are also some methane bands.

 

Here's the uncorrected version of Jupiter

Jup2013-11-13.png

 

And here's the same with the continuum removed. You could barely see the Calcium lines where the UV response is so low.

Jup2013-11-13Flat.png

 

 

Thanks for looking

John


  • Neil likes this

Celestron 8" F5 Newt on EQ5

Spectrographs 300 l/mm & 1200 l/mm, SA100

Mammut L429, Canon 1000d, Canon 450d

 

http://uk.groups.yah...up/astrobodger/


#2 Neil

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 12:19 PM

Looks very good John.

 

For those tht are not chemists CH4 = Methane. I'm also not a chemist, however, I have quite a lot of experience with Natural Gas and flowmetering etc...

 

methane.jpg

 

Perhaps you can treats us to some pictures of your new spectrometer John? 

 

Clear Skies

 

 

Neil.



#3 Andromeda

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 12:43 PM

Thanks for sharing John.

Will

#4 astrodoc71

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 02:12 PM

That's excellent John! Very interesting! The methane is quite intense. Ammonia (NH3) not as dominant as I would have thought

Regards

Dave


daveandtelescope.wordpress.com


#5 Astrobodger

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 09:29 PM

Thanks for the kind remarks guys.

 

Apparently, Jupiter's upper atmosphere is about 88–92% hydrogen and 8–12% helium by percent volume. The methane and ammonia are tiny by comparison yet show up in spectra as they absorb the sunlight.

 

I am working on a write up of the spectroscope.

 

thanks for looking

John


  • Neil likes this

Celestron 8" F5 Newt on EQ5

Spectrographs 300 l/mm & 1200 l/mm, SA100

Mammut L429, Canon 1000d, Canon 450d

 

http://uk.groups.yah...up/astrobodger/


#6 morsanimi

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 10:12 AM

Nice work John!

 

It is also nice to  see the Sodium double line separated and the calibration seems spot on with the methane bands at 619nm and 727nm. Can you go further to IR with loner exposures to get the 889 nm methane line as well?



#7 Astrobodger

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 01:39 PM

Hi Morsanimi,

 

The lines of the sodium doublet (or magnesium triplet) are visible but not individually split at this low resolution.

 

Exposure time is not the issue. It wont be useful to go much further into the IR with my setup because I will get overlap from the blue end of the 2nd order spectra. I would need to use an IR pass type filter (to block blue wavelengths) or try using a prism that splits light to single order only (but I suspect the dispersion may be too low to be useful).

 

John


Celestron 8" F5 Newt on EQ5

Spectrographs 300 l/mm & 1200 l/mm, SA100

Mammut L429, Canon 1000d, Canon 450d

 

http://uk.groups.yah...up/astrobodger/






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